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The 2015 Daniel Scott Weston Glaucoma Research Lecture

The lecture showcases a nationally recognized clinician or scientist whose work is significantly advancing our knowledge of glaucoma.

The annual Daniel Scott Weston Glaucoma Research Lecture was held at the Moldaw Residences in Palo Alto, CA on September 24, 2015.

The featured speaker was Yvonne Ou, MD, Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology, Glaucoma and Cataract Surgery at University of California, San Francisco.

Dr. Ou presented her lecture “How Do Neurons Die or Survive in Glaucoma?” which provided attendees with a background on the history of glaucoma, including how its definition has evolved over time from 400 BC to today. She discussed how we can theorize the potential existence of pre-diagnosis glaucoma by taking a closer look at the progression of shading in some of Vincent Van Gogh’s most well-known works of art including “Night Café with Pool Table,” “Starry Night,” and “The Potato Eaters.”

Dr. Ou identified the subtypes of retinal ganglion cells, revealing which are the most vulnerable in glaucoma, and explained that doctors currently use medications and surgical procedures to slow disease progression through lowering intraocular pressure, even as researchers continue to search for a cure.

Established in 2007 with a grant from Gladys and George Weston, DDS, in memory of their son Daniel, the lecture showcases a nationally recognized clinician or scientist whose work is significantly advancing our knowledge of glaucoma, particularly in the area of new therapies and progress toward a cure. Dr. Weston introduced Dr. Ou to more than 65 engaged attendees, including former Glaucoma Research Foundation Board members Michael Penn Sr., Bill Stewart and Art Takahara, and Catalyst Circle members Weston Anderson, and Anthony Fisher, PhD, Jane Weston, MD and Jan Horn, MD. Following Dr. Ou’s presentation the audience participated in an informative question and answer session.

Thomas Brunner commented: “We look forward to this annual lecture, hosted by the Westons, every year, as do many of our returning guests. I’d like to give a special thanks to Dr. Ou for joining us this year as our lecturer and providing us with the details of the very important work that she and her team at UCSF are conducting in the search for a cure.”

Last reviewed on May 03, 2016

This article appeared in the January 2016 issue of Gleams.

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